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Sugar substitute

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A sugar substitute is a food additive that duplicates the effect of sugar in taste, usually with less food energy. Some sugar substitutes are natural and some are synthetic. Those that are not natural are, in general, referred to as artificial sweeteners.

An important class of sugar substitutes are known as high-intensity sweeteners. These are compounds with sweetness that is many times that of sucrose, common table sugar. As a result, much less sweetener is required, and energy contribution often negligible. The sensation of sweetness caused by these compounds (the "sweetness profile") is sometimes notably different from sucrose, so they are often used in complex mixtures that achieve the most natural sweet sensation.

In the United States, six intensely-sweet sugar substitutes have been approved for use. They are saccharin, aspartame, sucralose, neotame, acesulfame potassium, and stevia. There is some ongoing controversy over whether artificial sweetener usage poses health risks. The US Food and Drug Administration regulates artificial sweeteners as food additives. Food additives must be approved by the FDA, which publishes a Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) list of additives. To date, the FDA has not been presented with scientific information that would support a change in conclusions about the safety of the six approved high-intensity sweeteners. The safe conclusions are based on a detailed review of a large body of information, including hundreds of toxicological and clinical studies.

There is also an herbal supplement, stevia, used as a sweetener. Controversy surrounds lack of research on stevia's safety and there was a battle over its approval as a sugar substitute.

Sugar substitutes Edit

Here is some information that should help with the switching of sugar to the artificial sweeteners. This chart might be of help to those of you who need to cook sugar free.

Sweet One (Acesulfame-k)

  • 4 calories per packet
  • 12 packets = 1 cup sugar
  • 1 packet = 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 3 packets = ¼ cup sugar
  • 4 packets = ⅓ cup sugar
  • 6 packets = ½ cup sugar
  • 12 packets = 1 cup sugar
  • Can be used in cooking and baking without losing sweetness.

Equal (Aspartame)

  • 4 calories per packet
  • 24 packets = 1 cup sugar
  • 1 packet = 2 teaspoons sugar
  • Loses sweetness when baked at high temperatures for a long time. But can be used in stir-fries or added during last few minutes of heating or cooking. Use only after cooking or in uncooked dishes.

Nutrasweet Spoonful (Aspartame)

  • 2 calories per teaspoon
  • 1 cup = 1 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon = 1 teaspoon sugar
  • Loses sweetness when heated. But can be used spoon for spoon in place of sugar in same foods as Equal.

Splenda (Sucralose)

  • 0 (zero) calories
  • 1 cup = 1 cup sugar 1 teaspoon = 1 teaspoon sugar
  • May not work well in recipes such as certain cakes that rely upon sugar for structure. Finished recipes may require refrigeration. See website for further details.

Sweet 'N Low (Saccharin)

  • 4 calories per packet
  • 12 packets = 1 cup sugar
  • 1 packet = 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 1/10 teaspoon = 1 teaspoon sugar
  • ⅓ teaspoon = 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1½ teaspoons = ¼ cup sugar
  • 1 tablespoon = ½ cup sugar
  • 2 tablespoons = 1 cup sugar
  • Can be used in cooking and baking without losing sweetness.

Brown Sweet 'N Low (Saccharin)

  • 20 calories per teaspoon
  • 1 teaspoon = ¼ cup brown sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon = 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon = ¼ cup brown sugar
  • 4 teaspoons = 1 cup brown sugar
  • Can be used in cooking or baking without losing sweetness. Note that measurements differ from packet sweeteners.

Adolph's

  • 2 shakes of jar = 1 teaspoon sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon = 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon = ¼ cup sugar
  • 2½ teaspoons = ⅔ cup sugar
  • 1 tablespoon = ¾ cup sugar
  • 4 teaspoons = 1 cup sugar

Sugar Twin

  • 1 teaspoon = 1 teaspoon sugar

Sugar Twin, Brown

  • 1 teaspoon = 1 teaspoon brown sugar

Sweet Magic

  • 1 packet = 2 teaspoons sugar

Sweet'ner

  • 1 packet = 2 teaspoons sugar

Liquid sweeteners Edit

Fasweet (liquid)

  • ⅛ teaspoon = 1 teaspoon sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon = 2 teaspoons sugar
  • ⅓ teaspoon = 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 tablespoon = ½ cup sugar
  • 2 tablespoons = 1 cup sugar

Sucaryl (liquid)

  • ⅛ teaspoon = 1 teaspoon sugar
  • ⅓ teaspoon = 1 tablespoon sugar
  • ½ teaspoon = 4 teaspoons sugar
  • 1½ teaspoons = ¼ cup sugar
  • 1 tablespoon = ½ cup sugar

Superose (liquid)

  • 4 drops = 1 teaspoon sugar
  • ⅛ teaspoon = 2 teaspoons sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon = 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1½ teaspoons = ½ cup sugar
  • 1 tablespoon = 1 cup sugar

Sweet-10 (liquid)

  • 10 drops = 1 teaspoon sugar
  • ½ teaspoon = 4 teaspoons sugar
  • 1½ teaspoons = ¼ cup sugar
  • 1 tablespoon = ½ cup sugar
  • 2 tablespoons = 1 cup sugar

Zero-Cal (liquid)

  • 10 drops = 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 30 drops = 1 tablespoon sugar
  • ¾ teaspoon = 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 tablespoon = ½ cup sugar
  • 2 tablespoons = 1 cup sugar

Honey

See also Edit

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