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Rosé wine

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Name Variations Edit

  • rose wine
  • pink wine

About Rosé wine Edit

Wikipedia Article About Rosé wine on Wikipedia

Rosé is a type of wine that is neither purely red wine nor purely white wine. It has some of the color typical of a red wine, but only enough to turn it pink. The pink color can range from a pale orange to a vivid near-purple, depending on the grapes and winemaking techniques.

There are three major ways to produce rosé. The first is used when rosé wine is the primary product. Red-skinned grapes are crushed after a short period to remove the color-giving skins from the pressed juice, rather than left in contact throughout fermentation as with red wine making. As the skins contain much of the strongly flavoured tannin and other compounds, this leaves the wine tasting more similar to a white wine. The second, saignee or bleeding, is used when the winemaker desires to impart more tannin and color to the wine, and removes some pink must. This is known as bleeding the vats. The third method, simple mixing of red and white wine, is discouraged in most wine growing regions now except for Rosé de Champagne. Even in Champagne many producers do not use this method.

Rosé wines are usually made from red grapes but -- contrary to the normal process of making red wine -- skins and stems are removed almost immediately, usually within 2 to 3 days. This brief contact with the skins and stems gives the wine its light pink (or rose) color. It also, however, is the reason that roses lack the body and character of most red or white wines. In general, rosé wines are very light-bodied and slightly sweet. They should be served chilled and can accompany a variety of lightly flavored foods. In the United States, the term Blush Wine has all but replaced that of rosé.

European rosés are almost always dry wines while American ones, such as white Zinfandel are often very sweet. European rosés act as a refreshing substitute for heavy red wines during the summer months.

In America blush wine is usually sweet rosé wine.

Rosé wine Recipes Edit

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