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Mandu

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Golden Dumplings - Mandu

Description Edit

Golden Dumplings - Mandu, Korean dumplings, can be boiled in water then served in soups. Or serve them like potstickers by frying them on one side then steaming them until done. Serve fried mandu with a soy-vinegar dipping sauce. If you prefer, you can make the stuffing without tofu (tubu in Korean), substituting ground beef or pork, or even ground turkey instead.

  • Serving Size: 4
  • Yield: 200 dumplings

Ingredients  Edit

Mandu filling Edit

Mandu wrappers and cooking Edit

Dipping sauce - (Chojang) Edit

Directions Edit

Mandu filling Edit

  1. Wrap the tofu in cheesecloth or a clean kitchen towel.
  2. Squeeze out the excess water.
  3. Crumble the tofu into a mixing bowl.
  4. Place the kimchi in a fine-mesh sieve or cheesecloth and press or squeeze to remove excess moisture.
  5. Add the kimchi to the bowl.
  6. Add the remaining mandu filling ingredients to the bowl and mix thoroughly.
  7. At this point, the mandu mixture may be covered and refrigerated until ready to fill the dumplings. (It will keep as long as one day.)

Stuff and cook the mandu Edit

  1. For best results, line 2 baking sheets with waxed paper, then dust a layer of cornstarch on the waxed paper to keep the mandu from sticking.
  2. Set out a small dish of water.
  3. Place several dumpling wrappers on a cutting board.
  4. Fill each with about 1 teaspoon of filling.
  5. Dip your finger in the water and run it over the edge of the dumpling skin.
  6. Fold the top over and press to seal, removing as much air as possible.
  7. Set the mandu on the prepared baking sheets while you stuff the remaining dumpling skins.
  8. Note: Koreans traditionally curve the mandu into a ring shape, so the ends meet and are sealed with water. This type of shape is ideal for soups, but for fried mandu, some prefer the flatter, half-moon shapes as described above. If you have one of the potsticker gadgets that folds and seals the dumplings in one motion, you'll find the process goes much quicker. You can also freeze the stuffed mandu on a cornstarch-dusted baking sheet to keep them from sticking together, then transfer to an air-tight container and freeze until ready to use.
  9. Heat a skillet with just enough vegetable oil to coat the bottom surface. (To speed up the cooking process, use two skillets.)
  10. When the oil is very hot, gently place a layer of stuffed mandu in the skillet, being careful not to overlap them.
  11. When the mandu are golden brown on the bottom, flip them over.
  12. Quickly add 2 tablespoons water to the pan, cover and steam the mandu until cooked through, about 2 minutes.
  13. Uncover the pan and place the mandu on a serving dish (you can keep them warm in a low oven while you cook the remaining mandu).
  14. Serve the mandu with dipping sauce.

Dipping sauce - (Chojang) Edit

  1. Combine all ingredients.
  2. Serve the dipping sauce in one communal bowl, or set out one small bowl and plate per person.

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